Sunday, January 20, 2008

Beethoven Triple Concerto Oistrakh Rostropovich Richter 1/4

We went to a performance of Beethoven's Concerto in C for Violin, Cello and Piano last night. It was good, but not as good as this YouTube version of it with Mstislav Rostropovich on cello, Sviatoslav Richter on piano, and David Oistrakh on violin. This is performed with the Moscow Philharmonic orchestra, Kyril Kondrachin, conductor, 50th Anniversary of the Moscow State Philarmonic Orchestra, Moscow Great Hall, 1970.

This is part 1 of 4.

The soloists in the performance this weekend's performances were all students at New England Conservatory in their teens or early twenties, and are all very impressive players.

6 comments:

CelloGirl said...

We played this in orchestra! Beautiful piece...looks like a hard one for the cello!

Maricello said...

Hi Cellogirl--that must have been fun, and challenging, to play this piece. The cello part is supposed to be the most difficult of the 3 solo parts: lots of very fast triplets and thumb position. I was not familiar with it before the concert, but glad to have been introduced to it.

CelloGirl said...

oh no...I was in the orchestra, way in the back of the secion :)!! The cellist played really well. My teacher says that this is a very hard piece for the cello.

Maricello said...

I did understand that you weren't playing the solo--it sounds like it would still be challenging to play the orchestral cello part! There is lots going on.

melissa said...

Don't ya just love youtube? :)

And that is a fabulous piece...will need to come back later and listen to the whole thing.

Anything that came out of the USSR with music or dance at that time was beyond top notch. Maybe absolute repression will do that to someone...

CelloGirl said...

Maricello - you are right! The orchestra part kinda kicked my butt. It was deceptively difficult for me. There's nothing like struggling over the orchestra part and then watching the solo cellist nail these impossible passages at a speed that I can't comprehend yet. My stand partner and I would watch him do these runs, then stare wide-eyed at each other and chuckle.

It was the once piece I've played in orchestra that I would rather have been in the audience than playing along.